Department links and descriptions

COMPUTER SCIENCE


The computer science program at Kehillah engages students in meaningful problem solving. A Freshman seminar introduces students to the fun of programming with code blocks and multi-sensor robots. In elective courses, students first learn algorithms and design patterns through the accessible language Python. Students also learn collaboration skills and best practices with Git and GitHub. Students can then progress to AP Computer Science in Java. More classes will follow as our program develops.

Computer Science Teachers:

Dr. Zachi Baharav, Ph.D. 
Mr. Daniel Kelley

COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES

Computer Science and Coding
Year-Long Course
Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Algebra 1

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to software design concepts through the accessible and powerful language Python. Students will solve problems and design projects spanning topics such as data structures, abstraction, data persistence, search algorithms, encryption, and object-oriented design. Good habits, such as revision control with Git, will also be practiced. Students will present work to their classmates at various points throughout the course. Students will choose a final project to develop. This course provides a solid foundation for further study in computer science; beginners and experienced programmers are welcome. Students must use a personal laptop for this course. Contact the school if this poses an unreasonable hardship.

AP Computer Science
Year-Long Course
Grade: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Computer Science and Coding

This course follows Computer Science and Coding with a deep exploration of object-oriented design in a compiled language. Students study the many facets of classes and interfaces as written in Java. Topics such as searching and sorting algorithms and performance are also covered. Intellectual property rights and ethical use of computer systems are topics of discussion. GitHub is again used for distribution and collection of class work and projects, and students learn advanced techniques for collaboration via GitHub.

Engineering I
Semester Course, Fall and Spring
Grade: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Computer Science and Coding

This course covers introductory engineering subjects with applications and hands-on projects. Students use the Arduino platform as a base for their work and add components as needed. Topics include circuits and Ohm’s law, digital circuitry, motor control, sensors and feedback, LCD displays, and A/D conversion and PWM. Students complete projects in each of these themes throughout the semester. Students should have demonstrated an aptitude for independent learning in Computer Science and Coding before taking this class.

Engineering II
Semester Course, Fall and Spring
Grade: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Engineering I

Students may take a second semester of Engineering, covering the same themes. Mixed in with Engineering I students, Engineering II students are expected to produce projects of greater sophistication or depth and to practice professional documentation and presentation of work.

English

The English Department focuses on developing critical thinking, writing, and communication skills using literary texts as the focus.  Classes utilize discussion to stimulate deeper engagement with the texts and students are asked to write in a variety of modes in response to what they read.  The department has an overall four-year writing goal to develop skills through the use of persuasive, analytical, and creative writing assignments.  The multi-step writing process emphasizes that revision is just as important as initial conception of ideas and students learn how to improve the fluidity and clarity of their writing.  Along with these written assignments, the classes engage with a variety of alternative assessments that encourage students to think about the texts from different angles, including creative pieces that are inspired by the literature they read.

English Teachers:
Mr. Jake Marmer
Ms. Lauren McElhatton
Ms. Sarah Muszynski
Mr. Randy Ribay
Ms. Tracy Woodham

English COURSES

Sequencing of Courses

For all freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, there is a standard year-long English course option.  In the tenth grade, there is an Honors section for students whose analytical abilities are further advanced and who are ready for an additional challenge.  Juniors and seniors have the opportunity to take AP Language or AP Literature, respectively, based on teacher recommendation.  Seniors not enrolled in AP Literature take themed semester courses.

 

Writing, Language, and Literature

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9

This year-long course begins developing students’ critical writing skills through a program of prewriting, writing, editing, and revision that are central to Kehillah’s four-year sequential literary writing program. Students practice, develop, and refine analytical and creative writing skills, study and apply English language structures and rules, and practice reading and critical thinking skills through a study of literary devices. They read a selection of short stories, poems, plays, non‐fiction, and novels, which may include Pride and Prejudice, Romeo and Juliet, Lord of the Flies, and Master Harold…and the Boys.

 

 

 

Responding to Literature

Year-Long Course

Grade: 10

This year-long course exposes students to a range of canonical and contemporary literature through a variety of genres. Students develop critical thinking and analytical writing skills through close reading of the texts. Major works may include: The Merchant of VeniceThings Fall Apart, When the Emperor Was Divine, In the Time of the Butterflies, The Things They Carried, and The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, as well as poetry and short stories. This course continues developing students’ critical writing skills through a program of prewriting, writing, editing, and revision. The extensive writing program requires students to write formally and informally on a frequent basis.

 

 

Responding to Literature Honors

Year-Long Course

Grade: 10 (with teacher recommendation)

This year-long honors course meets many of the same goals as the traditional Responding to Literature course, but employs methods which require the students to work more independently and to take on greater challenges. Students enrolled in this course take part in an intensive study of literature and related critical essays as well as a vast and varied writing program. Some of the major works that are studied may include: The Merchant of Venice, Things Fall Apart, When the Emperor Was Divine, In the Time of the Butterflies, The Things They Carried, and Americanah, as well as poetry and short stories. Students have opportunities to make interdisciplinary connections between literature and other disciplines, and are expected to be more self-guided in their study and more in-depth in their analysis. The extensive writing program requires students to write formally and informally on a frequent basis.

 

 

 

American Literature

Year-Long Course

Grade: 11

This full-year course is designed to offer students multiple perspectives with which to view American Literature from the 1800s to the 21st century. As students examine literary movements such as Romanticism, Naturalism, Realism, and Transcendentalism, they will study literature within the context of American themes, ideas, time periods, and social change. Throughout the course, we will explore the ways in which race, gender relations, and important historical events transformed the American literary landscape of both the past and of today. Emphasis will be placed on literary analysis and the use of tools to enhance voice in both academic and personal essay styles, including persuasive, expository, and narrative compositions. Students will read fiction and non-fiction, short stories, poetry, and dramatic texts, which may include works by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Zora Neale Hurston, James Baldwin, Mark Twain, Lorraine Hansberry, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Alice Walker.

 

 

 

AP English Language and Composition

Year-Long Course

Grade: 11 (with teacher recommendation)

AP English Language and Composition is a college-level writing course that emphasizes the critical examination of non-fiction texts at a high level. Writing assignments for this course include analytical, argumentative, synthesis, and narrative essays. Both timed and untimed essays are an integral part of the course. Through the writing of multiple complex argument essays, students learn to read critically and analytically, synthesize sources, consider style and rhetoric, and compose arguments for topics of their choosing. Possible texts include The Language of Composition, Between the World and Me, The Handmaid’s Tale, and The Poisonwood Bible, as well as a wide variety of essays and speeches. This course prepares students for the AP English Language and Composition exam.

 

AP English Literature and Composition

Year-Long Course

Grade: 12 (with teacher recommendation)

This college-level English course engages literary texts at a high level of critical thinking and analysis. Students will read a wide range of works covering different genres and time periods, focusing on close reading and connecting the craft of writing with its purpose. Texts will include Hamlet, Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde, The Kite Runner, Notes from the Underground, Beloved, as well as How to Read Literature Like a Professor, and various short stories and poetry in Perrine’s Literature Sound, Structure & Sense. Writing timed essays is an integral part of the course, as are longer, more complex analyses. This course prepares students for the AP English Literature and Composition exam.

 

Fall Semester Senior Courses

The Harlem Renaissance

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 12

This semester-long course will explore novels, short stories, poetry, plays, and other texts produced by Black artists living in Harlem in the 1920s and 1930s. Students will also learn about the social and historical contexts that gave rise to these works while considering their enduring relevancy. Discussion-based classes and a variety of writing assignments will help students continue to develop their critical and analytical thinking skills. Possible texts may include The Ways of White Folks by Langston Hughes, Cane by Jean Toomer, Passing by Nella Larsen, and a variety of poetry and dramatic works from the time period.

 

Exploring American Identities Through Immigrant Fiction

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 12

By exploring the social, economic, linguistic, and psychological factors that shape a diverse set of immigrant experiences, we can come to understand our own world anew as interconnected and abundantly diverse. This class will step into lives and realities very different than the mainstream Silicon Valley experience. This course will analyze literature from various immigrant populations in order to help students trace historically informed patterns. Students will also examine immigration from the child’s and adolescent’s perspectives, exploring how immigration impacts generations uniquely. Finally, we will focus on narratology and the craft of storytelling, concluding with a thoughtful academic exploration of how immigration narratives can enrich our nation on multiple levels. Possible texts may include How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents, A Different Mirror, The Arrival, What is the What?, The Interpreter of MaladiesThe Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar WaoThe Refugees, and  Inside Out and Back Again.

 

 

Creative Writing: Short Fiction

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 12

This semester-long course focuses on helping students improve their ability to write short stories that contain vivid settings, believable characters, engaging plots, and meaningful themes. Students will write several short stories, participate in writing workshops in which they will learn to provide and receive useful feedback, and utilize the writing process to revise and improve their stories. Additionally, students will read texts about the writing process and learn to critique and analyze professional short stories from a writer’s perspective. Possible texts may include On Writing by Stephen King, The Best American Short Stories: 2016 edited by Junot Díaz, The Elements of Style by E.B. White and William Strunk Jr., and a variety of essays.

 

World Jewish Literature

Cross-listed with Jewish Studies

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 12

In this class we will encounter some of the most stimulating, profound, and exciting works of modern literature ever written. Using literature as the entry point, we will explore the intellectual, social, cultural, and political realities of Jewish communities in North America, Israel, Egypt, Western Europe, the former Soviet Union, and South America. By alternating critical analysis with creative writing, the course will move towards a more complete understanding of the masterpieces we’ll be engaging. Ultimately, we will examine our own identities through the lens of these works. There will be many engaging discussions, debates, and even performances. Primary readings will include short stories, novel excerpts, and poems by Franz Kafka, Isaac Babel, Yehuda Amichai, Clarice Lispector, Andre Aciman, and Philip Roth.

 

Spring Semester Senior Courses

The Civil Rights Movement through Literature

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 12

This semester-long course is centered around texts that illuminate pivotal moments in the fight for civil rights from the 1950s to the present. Students will explore how these texts were impacted by their historical context, and how they, in turn, impacted society. Discussion-based classes and a variety of writing assignments will help students continue to develop their critical and analytical thinking skills. Possible texts may include Blues for Mister Charlie by James Baldwin, Warriors Don’t Cry by Melba Patillo Beals, The Hate U Give by Angela Thomas, as well a variety of poetry and other texts.

 

Utopias and Dystopias

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 12

This course centers on great works of Utopian and Dystopian fiction, tracing patterns in what societies value, fear, and imagine for the future. The course will focus on critical thinking and writing, including deep reflection on society and what it means to be an engaged citizen. The couse will delve into universal questions like: Should freedom be relinquished for security? What is the ideal balance of structure for society? How can individual freedom and social chaos be balanced? What role do intellectuals and/or the laboring class play in determining society? The course will delve into literary allusions and analysis of 1984, Brave New World, a variety of short stories, and excerpts from longer utopian works.

 

 

Banned Books

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 12

This class will explore censorship in literature and the reasoning behind individual/group grievances about written words. What does it mean for a piece of literature to be “banned?”  Why have we adopted the term “banned?” What does it reflect about communities and cultural expectations or norms? Not only will we be reading pieces that certain communities challenged or banned at a certain period in time, but we will also explore the history of censorship -both in the US and abroad – its current uses and impact today.  Perhaps most importantly, we will explore challenges to freedom of speech and ask what it means to truly believe in this first amendment freedom.  Possible texts may include:  I Know Why the Caged Bird SingsThe Road, and “Howl.”

 

Creative Writing: The Novel

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 12

This semester-long course will guide students through drafting a novel. Throughout the process from prewriting to the final page, students will learn to effectively world-build, characterize, create and sustain suspense, and consider issues of style. Additionally, students will provide and receive feedback through writers’ workshops, read texts about the writing process, and learn to critique and analyze novels from a writer’s perspective. Possible texts may include Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott, Rock Your Writing by Cathy Yardley, The Elements of Style by E.B. White and William Strunk Jr., The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins, and a variety of essays.

 

Jewish Literature for the New Millennium

Cross-listed with Jewish Studies

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 12

This course will focus on Jewish Literature written in the past decade and a half, mostly in the U.S. and Israel, examining some of the most poignant contemporary concerns running through the Jewish community worldwide. We will look at authors who have repeatedly made it to the top of the bestseller lists; we will also look at lesser known, though just as exciting, writers of the avant-garde. We will read short stories, poems, and a graphic novel. We will also check out the burgeoning genre of digital writing, watch films, and more. We will attempt to engage some of the actual writers of the texts we will be studying via social media, live chats, and possibly, in-person appearances.

History

The History Department at Kehillah Jewish High School has a strong focus on critical thinking. To us, history is not a list of material to be memorized; it is a constructed narrative of perspectives that must be analyzed in order to tell a larger story of trends over time. To accomplish this, we strengthen the skill of document analysis with a particular focus on perspective.

The students practice cross-cultural comparisons, historical contextualization, cause and effect explanation, and periodization through various activities, assignments, inter-departmental opportunities and role-playing simulations. In turn, the students communicate their understanding of the past through multiple modes of assessment: written, verbal, and creative. It is the goal of the History Department that Kehillah students are able to construct their understanding not only of the past, but of their present and future as well.

 

History Teachers:
Dr. Nathan Bennett
Mr. Chris Chiang
Dr. Sarah Janda
Ms. Katherine Ratledge
Ms. Jaclyn Zarrella

History COURSES

World History 1
Year-Long Course
Grade: 9

World History 1 involves students in an interdisciplinary study of selected ancient, classical, and medieval societies from the Middle East, Asia, Europe, and Latin America. The main themes of this course include: What makes us civilized? How are group identities formed? How are religions formed? How should we live our lives? Why do governments fail? How do religions unite and divide? How do religions promote peace and violence? How is wealth created? By exploring these questions through ancient, classical, and medieval societies, students gain a lens into understanding and shaping the modern world. In addition, the integration of Jewish history throughout the course demonstrates how both Jews and Judaism influenced and were affected by historical events. World History 1 improves students’ analytical ability through class discussion, debates, speeches, primary-source analysis, research, essay writing, and interdisciplinary projects.

 

World History 2
Year-Long Course
Grade: 10

In World History 2, students study major turning points that shaped the modern world, from the late eighteenth century through the present. They trace the rise of democratic ideas, follow the spread of European influence across the globe, and examine the cause and course of two world wars. The goal of the course is to develop an understanding of the historical roots of current world issues by situating them in their historical, geographic, political, economic, and cultural contexts. Through the extensive use of primary and secondary documents, students consider multiple accounts of events in order to understand international relations from a variety of perspectives. The students continue their development of historical writing and gain proficiency in incorporating document analysis as evidence in their papers.

 

 

 

United States History
Year-Long Course
Grade: 11

This course entails a review of the foundation of the United States and a thematic exploration of the growth and development of the United States. The main themes of the course include the framework of a democratic government, immigration and settlement patterns, expansion and interactions abroad, environmental change, civil rights and civic engagement. A primary goal of the course is to uncover the connections between past events and issues facing contemporary America. Students frequently demonstrate their understanding of course content through reflective writing assignments, comparative textual analysis, debates, oral presentations, collaborative projects, primary-source documents, simulations, and film analysis. Students successfully completing this course gain the tools to become informed, engaged, and active participants in the American political system.

 

AP United States History
Year-Long Course
Grade: 11 (with teacher recommendation)

In this college-level course, students gain the ability to make informed judgments about key historical questions by mastering knowledge of U.S. history and honing skills for analyzing primary and secondary sources. Constant reading and writing assignments, frequent timed tests and quizzes, thorough preparation for class activities, and independent research characterize this intense course. Using multiple points of view and varied formats, students explore the major themes and concepts in nine chronological periods from 1491 through the present. The course emphasizes the following historical thinking skills: analyzing evidence, interpretation, comparison, contextualization, synthesis, causation, patterns of continuity and change over time, periodization, and argumentation. Through this exploration, students develop an understanding of our national story. This course prepares students for the AP US History exam. It is required that students have a conversation with their World History II teacher before selecting this class. Students are required to attend an additional 30-minute morning class each week (day TBD).

 

 

Fall Semester Exploratory Courses

AP US Government and Politics
Fall Semester Course
Grade: 12

This semester course is a team-based policy course that focuses on college-level original field research in direct contact with real policy experts, government representatives, and citizens. Students will compete against other AP government classes in other schools in simulated government experiences like the “We the People” program. Students should expect half of their out of class work to be done with a small team of classmates for the entire semester. Students will have opportunities to do optional field studies with real government agencies and will be expected to prepare their teams for these field studies, whether or not they plan to go themselves on these optional trips.  This course prepares students for the AP US Government exam. It is required that students have a conversation with their US History teacher before selecting this class. Students are required to attend an additional 30-minute class meeting each week (day TBD).

 

Latin American History
Fall Semester Course
Grade: 11, 12

This course surveys the history of Latin America from the period of the Wars for Independence in the early nineteenth century until the present. Drawing upon primary-source documents, audio/visual materials, and works produced by historians, the class will explore the social hierarchies that emerged out of the region’s colonial and pre-colonial past. The course will also examine the struggle in Latin America to create nation-states, and the ways in which relations with foreign governments and economies have shaped the lives of people living in Latin America. The course will conclude with an examination of the ways Latin Americans are navigating the increasingly transnational world of the early twenty-first century.

 

 

 

History of Zionism and Israel

Cross-listed with Jewish Studies
Fall Semester Course
Grade: 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of World History 1 and World History 2

This course is designed to introduce students to the historical circumstances that gave rise to Zionism and eventually to the State of Israel. Using a combination of primary and secondary source documents, students explore the different forms of Zionism that developed in the 19th and 20th centuries and how these ideologies shaped the country that we call Israel. This course also follows the development of the State of Israel from early Zionist settlement, to the UN partition plan and the War of Independence, to the unresolved Arab/Israeli conflict. Students pay special attention to the way in which historical narratives are constructed, and issues of perspective regarding those who experienced this historical period. Finally, students consider the centrality of the State of Israel in the context of modern Jewish history. Students consider some of the following questions: What impact has Israel had on Jewish life and identity since its inception? How are the State of Israel and the conflict in the Middle East an outgrowth of modernity? How does Israel wield power in relation to its ideals? How can Israel be both a Jewish state and a democracy?

 

 

Spring Semester Exploratory Courses
Economics
Spring Semester Course
Grade: 11, 12

This semester course examines systems of economic thinking, theory, research, and application that apply to entire economic systems, whether they be local, state, national, or global economies. The primary actor in studying entire systems will be the study of the actions of governments and intergovernmental organizations, and the citizens and political groups that influence macroeconomic public policies. This course will examine and simulate the role of money and financial institutions. This course will help students examine and formulate their own perspectives as citizens on the proper role of government in local, state, national, and global economies on issues like economic growth, international trade, free trade organizations, poverty, and globalization.

 

History of San Francisco Bay Area
Spring Semester Course
Grade: 11, 12

This semester course will empower students to explore the history of the diversity of perspective and experience in their own home of the San Francisco Bay Area. The content of the course will cover a breadth of topics such as the indigenous Ohlone people, the Gold Rush era, urban planning and the World’s Fair, the earthquake of 1906, immigration and exclusion, social and political movements throughout the 20th century, evolving industry and urbanization, and the rise of Silicon Valley. Students in this course will conduct research into local history as well as interact with the physical sites in our area. Possible projects include: collecting oral histories, creating guided tours, drafting infrastructure and environmental policy proposals, and documentary filmmaking. Students who take this course must be willing to participate in external site trips to areas in the Bay Area. These trips may occur during after school hours or on Sundays.

 

 

 

Global Cold War History
Spring Semester Course
Grade: 11, 12

The Cold War continues to be a strong influence on global politics and policy today. Many of our current institutions (UN, NATO, etc.) and our understanding of modern international relations were likely influenced by the omnipresent threats in a struggle for both external dominance and internal security. In this course we will examine the origins of the Cold War; however, we will mainly focus on the impact of the Cold War on a global scale. We will examine areas of impact that are generally overlooked in a historical context that is overshadowed by the mighty powers of the US and USSR. We will study the impact of the Cold War on Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. The course will explore the origins, survey the events, and analyze the legacies of these various theaters of the Cold War. As a whole, this course will use deep historical analysis to build a foundation for looking at current and future domestic and especially foreign policy. This course will be reading intensive and will be structured as a discussion-based college-level course. There will be a capstone persuasive research paper at the end of the course.

History

The Kehillah Jewish Studies Department is innovative and looks to engage students in intellectual, academic, spiritual, and social ways. At Kehillah, the Jewish Studies department particularly draws on the 3000 years of tradition, lore, and wisdom, which it combines with best of modern pedagogy.

The Jewish Studies department prepares Kehillah students to be more balanced citizens of the world.

Jewish Studies Teachers:

JEWISH STUDIES COURSES

Fall Semester Courses

 

Tradition in the Midst of Change (HI)

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 9, 10

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of an HI Jewish Studies course or placement in Hebrew 3 or beyond

“There are 70 facets to the Torah” (Abraham Ibn Ezra’s Introduction to the Torah). How do different denominations today interpret the ancient text of the Torah to fit modern times? In this introductory course, students will encounter Rabbinic texts as they have attempted to interpret and apply Biblical ideas to a developing world. Topics that will be addressed are Jewish reactions to: contradictions between science and theology, technology and Jewish law, reactions to movements such as Feminism and LGBTQ rights, and how non-Jews can find their place in the Jewish community. Students of all backgrounds will gain skills allowing them to access core classical Jewish texts and utilize them in building an argument on a contemporary issue. We will engage in meaningful conversations and learn to craft a well-informed opinion based on textual evidence.   In this Hebrew Intensive course, we will study the primary sources in Hebrew. There will be focus on interpretation and recognizing ambiguity in the original text.

 

 

Tradition in the Midst of Change

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 9, 10

“There are 70 facets to the Torah” (Abraham Ibn Ezra’s Introduction to the Torah). How do different denominations today interpret the ancient text of the Torah to fit modern times? In this introductory course, students will encounter Rabbinic texts as they have attempted to interpret and apply Biblical ideas to a developing world. Topics that will be addressed are Jewish reactions to: contradictions between science and theology, technology and Jewish law, reactions to movements such as Feminism and LGBTQ rights, and how non-Jews can find their place in the Jewish community. Students of all backgrounds will gain skills allowing them to access core classical Jewish texts and utilize them in building an argument on a contemporary issue. We will engage in meaningful conversations and learn to craft a well-informed opinion based on textual evidence.

 

 

 

Jokers of the Book: Jews and the Development of Jewish Humor

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 9, 10

Known historically as the “People of the Book,” the Jews are perhaps better known in the modern era as the “People of the Joke.” With a history of popular humor production that dates from the 19th century onward, Jewish comedy writers like Mel Brooks and Jerry Seinfeld contributed heavily to the entertainment world in a variety of locales. The comedy industry, particularly in the United States, would come to be dominated by Jewish writers, whose cultural backgrounds frequently played a role in their comedic products. This course will survey the development of Jewish humor as a cultural phenomenon during the 19th and 20th centuries, focusing mainly on the history of American Jewish comedic output. The course will conclude with a student-produced comedic performance piece.

 

 

 

Feminism, Law, and Tradition (HI)

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 9, 10

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of an HI Jewish Studies course or placement in Hebrew 3 or beyond

The feminist movement has generated a broad range of questions about the study and value of women’s lives and experience. Modern day feminists who live and study the Jewish tradition have made Judaism subject to these questions. In this course, we will turn a spotlight on traditional Biblical and Rabbinic texts, Jewish law, culture, and history, evaluating the place of women within the tradition. Among the topics that will be highlighted are marriage, divorce, and family law, women’s roles within the synagogue, as well as women’s participation in ritual and leadership positions. The course will include an examination of both the classical Jewish law texts on these topics as well as a discussion of more current positions on the issues covered. In this Hebrew Intensive course, we will study the primary sources in Hebrew. There will be focus on interpretation and recognizing ambiguity in the original text.

 

 

Feminism, Law, and Tradition

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 9, 10

The feminist movement has generated a broad range of questions about the study and value of women’s lives and experience. Modern day feminists who live and study the Jewish tradition have made Judaism subject to these questions. In this course, we will turn a spotlight on traditional Biblical and Rabbinic texts, Jewish law, culture, and history, evaluating the place of women within the tradition. Among the topics that will be highlighted are marriage, divorce and family law, women’s role within the synagogue, as well as women’s participation in ritual and leadership positions. The course will include an examination of both the classical Jewish law texts on these topics as well as a discussion of more current positions on the issues covered.

 

 

 

Midrash: Ancient Jewish Art

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 9, 10

Midrash is both a form of storytelling and a poetic Biblical commentary. It is also a great deal more than that: witty, mystical, wildly imaginative, it reflects the creative impulse of innumerable generations of thinkers and dreamers. In this class students will learn how Midrash was developed in the ancient days; we’ll also read contemporary midrash – poetic, spiritual, and political. Students will compile a portfolio of their own midrashim, which they will compose using a variety of literary mediums. There will be lots of philosophizing, creative writing, creative thinking, and collaborative work.

 

 

 

O-M-G: 20th and 21st Century Jewish Philosophy of God

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 9, 10

Oh. My. God? Before asking if we believe in God or what we believe about God, it helps to understand what we mean when we say the word God. In order to help us each decide how to define and relate to this word for ourselves, this course will explore the approaches of various 20th and 21st century Jewish philosophers including Mordechai Kaplan, Martin Buber, Abraham Joshua Heschel, and more. These thinkers will present some ideas about God that are drastically different from what we may be accustomed to, affording students the opportunity to evaluate those ideas for themselves and develop their own in a more well thought out way.

 

 

 

Bibliodrama: Sinners

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 9, 10

In this course, students will examine Biblical stories of sin and punishment. Selected stories will be examined through close analysis of the text as well as through theater writing and acting exercises. Both textual and theatrical exploration will be geared towards developing an empathic understanding of characters who might otherwise be judged instead of understood. Students will write and perform scenes and monologues that reflect their creative interpretations of the text. No acting or writing experience necessary.

 

 

 

Holocaust Historical Perspectives

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 9, 10

This survey class of the Holocaust begins with the rise of the Nazi Party in Weimar Germany and continues through the end of World War Two in 1945. Students will learn about the political climate that led to Hitler’s rise and his consolidation of power. We will learn about the diversity of Jewish life in Europe prior to the Holocaust. While we will learn about the mechanics of the Holocaust, attention will be focused on the experience of the Jews of Europe. The course will be taught through lecture, discussion, video, small group work, student presentations, and debate. Students should expect to complete and present a research project in an area of their interest that addresses the larger themes of the course. The semester will conclude with a discussion on the ethics of forgiveness following the Holocaust. Our texts this semester will include Elie Wiesel’s Night and Simon Wiesenthal’s The Sunflower: On the Possibilities and Limits of Forgiveness.

 

 

 

Nationalisms

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 9, 10

This semester-long course will examine the historical, political, and intellectual roots of nationalism and consider the engagement of leading African-American and Jewish figures within this tradition in the 20th century. Students in this discussion-based course will study key cultural, political, and religious nationalist movements, read and analyze primary texts (including essays by Moses Hess, Ahad Ha’am, Abraham Kook, W. E. B. DuBois, and Booker T. Washington), and consider the responses to these figures by post-nationalists and critics of nationalism. This course will also explore the often intertwining paths of nationalism and alternative ideas of peoplehood rooted in race and religion.

 

 

 

Jewish Philosophy of Theater

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 10, 11, 12

You may assume that Jewish philosophers address questions like: Who is God? and How should I behave in the world? In this course, we will discover the philosophy of Martin Buber, a thinker who also asked: What is theater and what makes it great? We will explore these questions by engaging in acting exercises, reading Buber’s philosophy, and preparing parts of Buber’s own play: “Elijah” for performance. Ultimately, we will create exercises meant to train actors in a uniquely Buberian way.

 

 

 

Intersection of Jewish Law, Ethics, and Medicine (HI)

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of an HI Jewish Studies course or placement in Hebrew 3 or beyond

In this course, we will examine controversial medical procedures from the viewpoint of science, law, ethics and Jewish thought. Topics will include but are not limited to euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, brain stem death, transplants, and abortion. Core texts of Jewish law such as Talmud, Maimonides, and contemporary response will be applied to medical case studies. We will study classic ethical and legal texts such as the Hippocratic Oath and the Harvard Criteria for Brain Death. Analysis of high-level primary texts will lead us to engage in dynamic class discussions and debates. The course will culminate in a student-led research poster paper that addresses a question in medical ethics and Jewish law not covered in the main curriculum. In this Hebrew Intensive course, we will study the primary sources in Hebrew. There will be focus on interpretation and recognizing ambiguity in the original text.

 

 

Intersection of Jewish Law, Ethics and Medicine

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 11, 12

In this course, we will examine controversial medical procedures from the viewpoint of science, law, ethics and Jewish thought. Topics will include but are not limited to euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, brain stem death, transplants, and abortion. Core texts of Jewish law such as Talmud, Maimonides, and contemporary response will be applied to medical case studies. We will study classic ethical and legal texts such as the Hippocratic Oath and the Harvard Criteria for Brain Death. Analysis of high-level primary texts will lead us to engage in dynamic class discussions and debates. The course will culminate in a student-led research poster paper that addresses a question in medical ethics and Jewish law not covered in the main curriculum.

 

 

 

American Jews and the Politics of Race

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 11, 12

Are Jews white? Are Jews a race? How does the Jewish community relate to “other” races? This class will explore the wide spectrum of ways American Jews have thought of themselves in relation to the idea of race, how the answers to these questions changed over time, and how they continue to impact race relations today. Through readings, music, images, and films, we will explore the complex constructions of racial identity in American society. Specific topics to be explored include: the complex relationship of Jews and African Americans, Sephardi and Mizrahi Jews in the United States, the place of Jews as immigrants and subjects of “race science” in the early twentieth century, contemporary scientific ideas about DNA, and the role of race in American Jewish literature, music, and theater, and the contemporary realities of Jews of different races through adoption, conversion, and intermarriage.

 

 

 

Two Jews, Three Opinions: American Jews Debating Hot Button Issues

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 11, 12

Recent decades have witnessed escalating public conflict in America over “values” issues such as abortion and reproductive rights, recreational drugs, LGBTQ rights, sex education, and school choice. These conflicts symbolize and concretize deeper disagreements over the proper status of women, the nature of the family, the place of religion in modern society, and the national identities we pass on to the next generation. In this course, we will explore how these issues have been debated among American Jews and how American Jews continue to engage in these battles. The course will bring in several outside speakers from various Jewish organizations to speak so that students will be exposed to many perspectives on the issues.

 

 

 

History of Zionism and Israel

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 11, 12

Prerequisite: successful completion of World History 1 and World History 2

This course is designed to introduce students to the historical circumstances that gave rise to Zionism and eventually to the State of Israel. Using a combination of primary and secondary source documents, students explore the different forms of Zionism that developed in the 19th and 20th centuries and how these ideologies shaped the country that we call Israel. This course also follows the development of the State of Israel from early Zionist settlement, to the UN partition plan and the War of Independence, to the unresolved Arab/Israeli conflict. Students pay special attention to the way in which historical narratives are constructed, and issues of perspective regarding those who experienced this historical period. Finally, students consider the centrality of the State of Israel in the context of modern Jewish history. Students consider some of the following questions: What impact has Israel had on Jewish life and identity since its inception? How are the State of Israel and the conflict in the Middle East an outgrowth of modernity? How does Israel wield power in relation to its ideals? How can Israel be both a Jewish state and a democracy?

 

 

 

Modern Poetry & Jewish Experience

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 11, 12

In this course, you’ll find yourself at the intersection of poetry and technology, Jewish Studies and American Literature, Kehillah and the University of Pennsylvania. For the duration of the semester, we’ll join University of Pennsylvania’s award-winning, wildly popular web-based “Modern Poetry” course, and in addition to our in-class meetings, we will also interact with thousands of poetry enthusiasts all around the world via dedicated forums and video conferences. We’ll read some of the best poetry ever written, and use UPenn’s amazing resources: recordings of the poetry readings, archival material, and the expertise of the university’s faculty members. There will be lots of imaginative, close reading, as well as creative writing, pondering, experimenting, collaborative work, and intense discussions.

 

 

 

Sex and Gender in Kaballah

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 11, 12

In recent decades, gender and sexuality have become increasingly central topics in our society. Because the Kabbalistic system of the ten sefirot depicts the process of conception and birthing of the world into existence, gender and sexuality have always been central aspects of Kaballah. In this course, we will utilize contemporary academic and popular writing to help articulate some of the questions and problems with which we will wrestle. We will study Kaballah with an eye towards both critiquing the system for its treatment of gender and sex as well as using the system to craft our own individual approaches to the questions and problems with which we wrestle.

 

 

 

Contemporary Israel

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 11, 12

This semester-long course will encompass the political, cultural, and religious history of Israel from 1948 to the present. Students will examine the societal impact of important phenomena in Israeli history – including the Six Day and Yom Kippur wars, the Camp David Accords, immigration from Ethiopia and post-Soviet states, the Palestinian intifadas, the assassination of Yitzhak Rabin, and the recent fragmentation in Israeli electoral politics – and consider the responses offered by leading Israeli intellectuals to these developments. This discussion-based course will involve the consumption and analysis of a wide range of documentary sources, including historical, philosophical, religious and literary texts, and films.

 

 

 

World Jewish Literature

Cross-Listed with English

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 12

In this class, we will encounter some of the most stimulating, profound, and exciting works of modern literature ever written. Using literature as the entry point, we will explore the intellectual, social, cultural, and political realities of Jewish communities in North America, Israel, Egypt, Western Europe, the Former Soviet Union, and South America. By alternating critical analysis with creative writing, the course will move towards a more complete understanding of the masterpieces we’ll be engaging. Ultimately, we will examine our own identities through the lens of these works. There will be many engaging discussions, debates, and even performances. Primary readings will include short stories, novel excerpts, and poems by Franz Kafka, Isaac Babel, Yehuda Amichai, Clarice Lispector, Andre Aciman, and Philip Roth.

 

Spring Semester Courses

 

Leisure: The Basis of Culture

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 9, 10

Daydreaming, pondering, philosophizing… What a waste of time! Or is it? The most significant human achievements from the ancient times through our own — the greatest art, the most enduring ideas of philosophy, the spark for every technological breakthrough — originated in leisure, in moments of unburdened contemplation. We’ll read Jewish texts relating to the concept of Shabbat (or Sabbath), as well as resonating texts written by Greek and Buddhist thinkers. We’ll put our findings into practice and partake in the great intellectual and spiritual endeavor that is leisure. Note: leisure is a serious business! We will be reading philosophical and religious texts, researching, presenting, and more.

 

 

 

Israeli Culture and Identity through the Lens of Cinema

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 9, 10

In this course we will explore the way stories with Jewish themes, ideas, plots, and characters have been depicted in Israeli cinema. We will develop a framework for analyzing films and television; view several full-length films from different eras and genres; watch some episodes of current Israeli TV; examine films through personal, cultural, archetypal, and analytical lenses; discuss the responsibilities and problems that come with depicting Judaism on film; and write in a variety of styles about the films. Some of the questions we will ask are: How do Jews in Israel connect and identify with other minorities and their struggles? How can the new and old worlds coexist? How do Israeli films engage with common elements or themes in Jewish culture or history, such as intermarriage, the Holocaust, ethics, love, anti-Semitism, or life cycle events? Given their religious values, do Jews have an obligation to pursue more responsible film-making?

 

 

 

Wisdom for Life from Judaism and Buddhism

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 9, 10

How do I become happier? How do I deal with anger? Fear? Love? Friendship? We will explore how these questions and more are addressed in Jewish and Buddhist wisdom teachings. In this course, we will examine both traditions to find similarities and differences. Additionally, we will discover ways in which Buddshist wisdom can enhance our understanding and application of Jewish wisdom and vice-versa.

 

 

 

 

 

American Jews, Protest Music and Social Change

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11

Some say that the pen is mightier than the sword…what about music? Music has the power to uplift, inspire and disrupt the status quo. This course will look at the history of American Jews and protest music starting with Yiddish culture labor movement protest songs. We will then explore artists like Bob Dylan and Peter Yarrow during the Civil Rights movement. We will also explore modern day protest music. The course will conclude with a concert where students perform their own protest music.

 

 

 

Bibliodrama- Complex Families: Return of the Jealousy (H)

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: ability to recognize Hebrew letters.

In this course, students will examine Biblical families that are beset by jealousy and favoritism. These themes will be examined through a close analysis of the text as well as through theater acting and writing. Students will write and perform scenes and monologs that reflect their creative interpretations of the text. While the text in this course will be accessed primarily in Hebrew, accommodations will be made for students with a wide range of Hebrew skills. The only Hebrew prerequisite is the ability to recognize Hebrew letters. No previous acting or writing experience necessary.

 

 

Tzomet: Intersection between Technology and Halakha (HI)

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of an HI Jewish Studies course or placement in Hebrew 3 or beyond

A pen with disappearing ink for writing on Shabbat; an app that stops commerce on your website on Saturdays; an electronic wheelchair that runs on a modulated current. These are some of the innovative solutions created to merge Halakhic Judaism with modern life.  This course will examine the intersection between Jewish law and its interaction with technology.  Students will spend the first part of the semester studying the laws of Shabbat. The lectures will be taught alongside labs that demonstrate how these Biblical and Talmudic concepts can be applied to various technological systems such as electric lights, electronic circuits, motion detectors, etc.  In the second part of the course, we will be using the Engineering Arts Lab to design a working prototype that will answer a current need in Halakhic modern life.  In this Hebrew Intensive course, we will study the primary sources in Hebrew. There will be a focus on interpretation and recognizing ambiguity in the original text.

 

 

 

Tzomet: an Intersection between Technology and Halakha

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 10, 11, 12

A pen with disappearing ink for writing on Shabbat; an app that stops commerce on your website on Saturdays; an electronic wheelchair that runs on a modulated current. These are some of the innovative solutions created to merge Halakhic Judaism with modern life.  This course will examine the intersection between Jewish law and its interaction with technology.  Students will spend the first part of the semester studying the laws of Shabbat. The lectures will be taught alongside labs that demonstrate how these Biblical and Talmudic concepts can be applied to various technological systems such as electric lights, electronic circuits, motion detectors, etc.  In the second part of the course, we will be using the Engineering Arts Lab to design a working prototype that will answer a current need in Halakhic modern life.

 

 

 

Hebrew Bible, Quran, and Christian Scripture: A Conversation

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 11, 12

This course will examine characters, stories, and themes that appear in The Hebrew Bible as well as The Quran and Christian Scriptures. We will put different versions of the same stories into conversation with each other, analyzing differences in each telling to identify those versions’ different perspectives. Additionally, students will consider some of the goals of telling these stories, analyzing each version for strategies used in order to accomplish these goals. Ultimately, students will create their own versions of these stories, utilizing the benefits of each version studied.

 

 

 

Artists on the Edge

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 11, 12

What does it mean to be a radical artist? How does an artist break the rules in a way that is deeply meaningful and transformative? What does it mean to be an original thinker? We’ll encounter some of the greatest avant-garde art movements of the 20th and 21st century, paying close attention to Jewish artists who were instrumental in these movements’ emergence. Is there something about the Jewish identity of these artists (which many of them denied or considered irrelevant) that aligned them with a tradition of rule-breaking and experimentation? We’ll read radical poetry and prose, listen to experimental music, enjoy avant-garde visual art and theater, and channel our findings into our own genre-bending art.

 

 

 

In Defense of Equality: American Jews, the United States Constitution, and the Struggle for First Amendment Rights

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 11, 12

Is hate speech free speech? Is blocking highway traffic for public protest illegal? Is it unconstitutional to ask religious employers to provide birth control to their employees? Should private religious schools receive unregulated funds from the government? The First Amendment is vital to providing guidelines for freedoms essential to American democracy: freedom of speech and assembly, a free press, free exercise of religion, and the prohibition against religious establishments. Interpreting these principles for everyday life is complicated, particularly since a review of U.S. Supreme Court decisions shows First Amendment concepts did not come to have any significant meaning until the 1920s and 1930s. Once they did, a rigorous effort was made by jurists to sway the court in their favor. We will look at these First Amendment battles then and now, the role of Jewish jurists and organizations, what the future of First Amendment law may be, and what this means for the future of American Jewry. Students will have the chance to Skype with several scholars, jurists, and activists throughout the semester.

 

 

 

Choose Your Own Adventure: Guided Independent Inquiry in Jewish Studies

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 11, 12

The course presents students with the opportunity to explore a topic/issue within the realm of Jewish studies. Given the versatile nature of Jewish studies, students can choose from a variety of disciplinary approaches: humanities, STEM, Visual and Performing Arts, service-learning and interdisciplinary studies. Students will be asked to answer a research question, show mastery in order to solve the problem and present their findings in a meaningful and convincing manner by the end of the course. The instructor will provide guidance and structure in a seminar-style learning environment. The possibilities for projects are endless. In addition to a traditional paper, some project suggestions include: a student created app that helps solve a problem within the Jewish community, a coding project that produces a website for easier translations of Rabbinic texts, a student written performance exploring a historical event, a social justice grant or training program, or a children’s book teaching about biographical research on an individual (such as Rabbi Lord Jonathan Saks or Drake).

 

 

 

Reproduction and the Future of Genetics

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 11, 12

What do traditional Jewish sources say about sex? Does the Torah condone the use of birth control? How do contemporary Rabbis grapple with the moral questions raised by the increasing feasibility of a “designer baby”? We will examine the scientific background as well as classical and modern core of Jewish texts. We will discuss the ethical perspectives on controversial issues such as birth control, in-vitro fertilization (IVF), and gender selection. Students will apply the foundational methodology they learn during the course through student-led research projects.

 

 

 

Reproduction and the Future of Genetics (HI)

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of an HI Jewish Studies course or placement in Hebrew 3 or beyond

What do traditional Jewish sources say about sex? Does the Torah condone the use of birth control? How do contemporary Rabbis grapple with the moral questions raised by the increasing feasibility of a “designer baby”? We will examine the scientific background as well as classical and modern core Jewish texts. We will discuss the ethical perspectives on controversial issues such as birth control, in-vitro fertilization (IVF), and gender selection. Students will apply the foundational methodology they learn during the course through student-led research projects. In this Hebrew Intensive course, we will study the primary sources in Hebrew. There will be focus on interpretation and recognizing ambiguity in the original text.

 

 

 

Bibliodrama – Prophets and Politicians

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 11, 12

It’s the 9th Century BCE. King Ahab reigns and the prophet Elijah prophesies. You are a prophet on the run from Queen Jezebel, who is sytematically killing all the prophets of Israel. This is the situation presented in the second half of the Biblical book of Kings 1. After studying a wide array of stories throughout the Bible where prophets meet God for the very first time, students will use the textual tropes they’ve discovered as well as some acting and writing work to create a prophet of their own. This character will be used as the lens through which each student analyzes and tells their own version of the Elijah narrative. Ultimately, student work will be performed for an invited audience. No previous writing or acting experience necessary.

 

 

 

Holocaust and Society

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 11, 12

The purpose of this course is for students to examine the intellectual, creative, and sociological developments of the changing political scene of the first half of the 20th century in Eastern Europe and the long term impact of the Holocaust on society. This course utilizes diaries, literature, artwork, and historical documents to tell the story of Eastern European Jews prior to, during, and immediately following the Holocaust. This course will also address the impact of the Holocaust on modern Jewish thought and identity. Following this we will study the way the Holocaust is understood (and used) through media and politics in the modern era. Our final project will be focused on the future of Holocaust memory and education. Texts will include Art Spiegelman’s Maus and Philip Roth’s The Plot Against America.

 

 

 

Social Justice

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 11, 12

In this course, we will discover the Jewish sources of social justice and consider their meaning for our own lives. By looking at Biblical, Rabbinic, and contemporary sources, we will identity key themes that have informed the Jewish commitment to social justice over the millennia.

 

 

 

Jewish Literature for the New Millennium

Cross-Listed with English

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 12

This course will focus on Jewish Literature written in the past decade and a half, mostly in the U.S. and Israel, examining some of the most poignant contemporary concerns running through the Jewish community worldwide. We will look at authors who have repeatedly made it to the top of the bestseller lists; we will also look at lesser known, though just as exciting, writers of the avant-garde. We will read short stories, poems, and a graphic novel. We will also check out the burgeoning genre of digital writing, watch films, and more. We will attempt to engage some of the actual writers of the texts we will be studying via social media, live chats, and possibly, in-person appearances.

MATH

Through discovery activities and more formal instruction, the mathematics department at Kehillah strives to instill in students a deep conceptual understanding of the topics, with an emphasis on critical thinking and applications of the material, all resting on a solid mastery of the techniques and processes necessary to solve the problems encountered.

Students are held responsible for knowing not just how to do a particular problem or technique, but also why it works, and when to employ a particular approach, and must be able to explain and justify the steps taken to arrive at a particular solution. Creative strategies, logic, synthesis and analysis are stressed. Technology, particularly graphing calculators, is used when appropriate.

Math Teachers:
Dr. Zachi Baharav, Ph.D.
Ms. Kathleen Edwards
Mr. Anthony Grabowski
Mr. Daniel Kelley
Mr. Ron Schloss
Dr. Dan Rosenthal

MATH COURSES

A student new to Kehillah takes the Kehillah math diagnostic/placement test. This test, along with the student’s transcript and recommendations, assists in determining proper course placement.

 

 

Algebra 1

Year-Long Course

This course is designed as a formal introduction to symbolic manipulation. Students learn to simplify expressions and solve equations, and ultimately to use those skills to solve real-world problems. Students begin with a review of the number line and properties of real numbers, and then progress to working with variables. Throughout the course, students build skills in factoring, working with fractions, and graphing equations, all of which will serve as a foundation for all future math courses.

 

 

 

Geometry

Year-Long Course

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Algebra 1 and math teacher approval

This course approaches Euclidean Geometry using both inductive and deductive logic. Through the discovery process and formal proofs students gain a deep understanding of and insight into geometry. Students are introduced to points, lines, and planes and progress to formal proofs involving triangles, quadrilaterals, and circles. Students are given a wide variety of problems to solve in the areas of congruence, similarity, area, volume, coordinate geometry, and right triangle trigonometry. Throughout the year, students continue to practice and develop their algebra skills. Students also have access to computer software as a visualization tool which they may use to complete independent projects.

 

 

 

Algebra 2/Trigonometry

Year-Long Course

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Geometry and math teacher approval

This course is a thorough study of functions, and their algebraic and graphical behavior. Students learn the concepts of domain, range, transformations, composition, and inverse relationships. Types of functions include linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic. Other topics include systems of equations, probability, and basic trigonometry. Students develop skills in manipulating expressions, and solving equations and real world problems. Students use their graphing calculator to solidify their understanding of the connection between an algebraic function and its graphical representation.

 

 

Algebra 2/Trigonometry Honors

Year-Long Course

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Geometry and math teacher approval

This course is a thorough study of functions, and their algebraic and graphical behavior. Students learn the concepts of domain, range, transformations, composition, and inverse relationships. Types of functions include linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic. Other topics include systems of equations, probability, and basic trigonometry. Students develop skills in manipulating expressions, and solving equations and real world problems. Students use their graphing calculator to solidify their understanding of the connection between an algebraic function and its graphical representation. This course moves at a fast pace to allow for the study of general problem-solving techniques and the opportunity for students to work with very difficult and intriguing problems.

 

 

Precalculus

Year-Long Course

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Algebra 2/Trig or Algebra 2/Trig Honors and math teacher approval

Students begin the course with a review of functions, and then progress to advanced trigonometry. Students review triangle trigonometry, and then learn to graph trigonometric functions, and apply trigonometric identities. Students will extend their understanding of exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, and rational functions. Other new topics include sequences and series.

 

 

 

Precalculus Honors

Year-Long Course

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Algebra 2/Trig or Algebra 2/Trig Honors and math teacher approval

Students begin the course with a review of functions, and then progress to advanced trigonometry. Students review triangle trigonometry, and then learn to graph trigonometric functions, derive and apply trigonometric identities. Students then extend their understanding of exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, and rational functions. Other new topics include sequence and series. In this honors course, students will master all the same skills as in the regular course, but with more challenging problems that require deeper conceptual understanding. This course moves at a fast pace to allow for the study of general problem-solving techniques and the opportunity for students to work with very difficult and intriguing problems.

 

 

 

AP Statistics

Year-Long Course

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Algebra 2/Trig or Algebra 2/Trig Honors and math teacher approval

This course offers students multiple tools to understand the data, graphs, and conclusions that the media presents to the public as well as enables students to see fallacies and errors in statistical analysis that are presented as fact. Data production, data description, data analyses for one or more variables, probability, and inference are major parts of this course. Students design and implement an experiment or an observational study to answer a key question for the purpose of supporting and improving an aspect of the school or community. Students determine the question they each wish to answer and supply a complete analysis and interpretation of the data gathered, using such tools as histograms, box and whisker plots, five-number summaries, density curves, confidence intervals, measures of statistical significance, and hypothesis tests. Students learn to use their TI graphing calculator and spreadsheets to perform a variety of forms of data analysis. This course prepares students for the AP Statistics Exam. Students will be required to attend an additional early morning class from 8:00 am to 8:30 am each week (day TBD).

 

 

Calculus

Year-Long Course

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Precalculus or Precalculus Honors and math teacher approval

This course covers single variable differential and integral calculus. It begins with a study of average rates of change and uses the concept of limits to derive the meaning of the derivative. Students encounter several applications of the derivative, including related rates and optimization problems. Through the study of area students develop the integral and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Various applications of integration are also studied.

 

 

 

AP Calculus AB

Year-Long Course

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Precalculus or Precalculus Honors and math teacher approval

This course covers single variable differential and integral calculus. It begins with a study of average rates of change and uses the concept of limits to derive the meaning of the derivative. Students encounter several applications of the derivative, including related rates and optimization problems. Through the study of area students develop the integral and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Volume, differential equations, and slope fields are also studied. This course prepares students for the AP Calculus AB exam. Students will be required to attend an additional early morning class from 8:00 am to 8:30 am each week (day TBD).

 

 

 

AP Calculus BC

Year-Long Course

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of AP Calculus AB and math teacher approval

This course reviews the curriculum covered in AP Calculus AB and continues on with the following topics: L’Hopital’s Rule, integration techniques, Euler’s Method, arc length in rectangular and parametric form, parametric form of the derivative, area in polar coordinates, sequences and series, convergence, and divergence. This class will also cover key topics in statistics and review the entire calculus material to prepare students for the AP Calculus BC exam.

 

 

 

Multivariable Calculus

Year-Long Course

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of BC Calculus and Linear Algebra and math teacher approval.

The course covers differential, integral, and vector calculus for functions of more than one variable. Topics include partial derivatives, double and triple integrals, and vector calculus in 2 and 3 dimensions.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Physical education at Kehillah is flexible and customized. Students are required to complete a year of physical education in order to graduate. The requirement can be met by taking on of Kehillah’s P.E. courses, such as physical conditioning (in the state-of-the-art Oshman Family JCC gym), or by participating in one of Kehillah’s competitive sports teams, or by engaging in a regular program of activity for one year or the equivalent.  Students have met this requirement through individual dance, workout, rock climbing and other programs.

Physical fitness for Kehillah students is enhanced beginning this year with complimentary student membership in the JCC fitness center across the street from campus.

Physical Education Teacher:
Mr. Ryan Greenfield 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES

Physical Training

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Under the guidance of a professional trainer, students learn about fitness and develop a workout routine to improve cardiovascular and strength fitness. Students use the JCC fitness center and learn the proper use of free weights and gym equipment. Students are required to dress appropriately for a full workout in the gym. Besides developing a personal workout, the students will also work together on a variety of exercises and fitness challenges. Students may repeat this course for credit.

SCIENCE

The science department at Kehillah focuses on providing opportunities for students to build their knowledge through a mix of analytical and computational problems as well as inquiry-based lab work. The department places a strong emphasis on providing consistent training in critical thinking as the foundation of the scientific method of problem-solving. As students progress through the curriculum, they are challenged to develop their own techniques to experimentally answer real-world questions, and they will learn how to clearly convey their findings to the community.

Science Teachers:
Ms. Wendy Gibbons
Mr. Anthony Grabowski
Dr. Ashlee Iyer
Mr. Robert Stewart
Ms. Maria Vicenty

SCIENCE COURSES

Biology

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9

This is a hands-on introductory course in the foundations of biology. Students learn basic principles and concepts in biology, while also improving their grasp of experimental techniques. In addition to lab work, an important focus of the class is on analyzing models of processes and transferring the understanding to additional application scenarios. Areas of study include the art of science, basic biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, evolution, physiology, and ecology.

 

Chemistry

Year-Long Course

Grade: 10, 11

This is an introductory course in the foundations of chemistry. Students learn basic chemical principles and apply them to problem solving. Experimental techniques are taught and used abundantly throughout the course. Both written and laboratory work are examined. Areas of study include the nature of matter, atomic structure, periodicity, bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gas behavior, and solution chemistry.

 

Chemistry Honors

Year-Long Course

Grade: 10, 11 (with teacher recommendation)

This is an advanced course in Chemistry. Students make an in-depth study of the theory and practices of chemical principles. Experimental techniques are taught and used abundantly throughout the course. Both written and laboratory work are examined. Honors Chemistry is distinguished from regular Chemistry in that it involves a more in-depth and math-based study of topics at an accelerated pace. Due to the pace of the course, strong independent learning skills are important, to ensure student success at the Honors level. Areas of study include nature of matter, atomic theory, nuclear chemistry, periodicity, bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gas behavior, solution chemistry, reaction kinetics, and thermodynamics.

 

 

Physics

Year-Long Course

Grade: 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Chemistry and satisfactory completion of Algebra 2

This is a course for students confident in their algebra and geometry skills, as it uses right triangle trigonometry throughout the course. This course includes an in-depth mathematical study of the physical laws of nature. Students develop strong investigative skills, and plan their own experiments, collect data, and analyze and evaluate their results. Areas of study include: kinematics, motion and forces, circular motion and gravitation, work and energy, momentum and collisions, waves, and an introduction to electricity.

 

 

 

Physics Honors: Mechanics

Year-Long Course

Grade: 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Chemistry and satisfactory completion of Algebra 2 and math and science teacher approval.

This course provides a systematic introduction to the main principles of physics and emphasizes the development of conceptual understanding and problem‐solving ability using algebra and trigonometry. This course is designed for the student who is advanced in both ability and motivation in the scientific area, who desires a strong scientific challenge, and who has the requisite mathematical skills to engage in this depth of study. Honors Physics is distinguished from regular Physics by a higher level of rigor, greater mathematical depth and sophistication, and a more in‐depth study of topics. Areas of study include: kinematics, motion and forces, circular motion and gravitation, work and energy, momentum and collisions, waves, and an introduction to electricity.

 

 

Human Anatomy and Physiology

Year-Long Course

Grade: 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Biology and Chemistry or Chemistry Honors

Human Anatomy and Physiology is designed to give students an introductory understanding of the structure, functions and relationships of body systems. This course is a laboratory science that connects knowledge of anatomical terminology with physiological processes and the disease states that arise in each organ system. The course covers basic immunology, the circulatory system, the skeletal and muscular systems, the nervous system, and at least one other body system of the student’s choosing. Some participation in dissections is required for success is this class. The course functions as an introduction to college-level study in the medical sciences and health fields.

 

 

 

Marine Biology

Year-Long Course

Grade: 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Biology and Chemistry or Chemistry Honors

Marine Biology will provide students with a broad introduction to applying physics, chemistry, and biology to ocean biomes with a focus on climate change and human effects on natural ecosystems. Topics will include physics of waves, meteorology and climatology, geological history of earth, chemistry of sea water, origins of life, marine protists and invertebrate taxonomy, evolution of marine vertebrates, ocean ecosystems, and human impacts. The course will be broadly lab based with hands-on inquiry into science principles through experimentation and introduction to lab techniques where possible. Students will participate in at least one field trip per semester, either on school days or on weekends.

 

 

Biotechnology

Year-Long Course

Grade: 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Biology and Chemistry or Chemistry Honors

Biotechnology covers a broad spectrum of scientific advancements that affect your daily life and the society we live in. Are you interested in the techniques that allow a tiny sample of DNA to be multiplied enough times to be useful in identifying (or exonerating) a murder suspect? Do you want to know how vaccines work and how we have almost completely eradicated deadly and debilitating diseases such as polio? In Biotechnology, we will investigate these questions and many more relating to genetics, medicine, and forensics. The class will focus heavily on learning laboratory techniques used in biotechnology research and analyzing the data collected from our experiments. We will integrate knowledge learned in Biology and Chemistry to support understanding of the topics we discuss, while looking to case studies and primary literature to understand real-world effects and implications of these scientific advancements.

 

 

 

Astronomy

Year-Long Course

Grade: 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Biology and Chemistry or Chemistry Honors

Have you ever wondered how the universe was formed? What are stars made up of? Is the sun the biggest star? Since ancient times, humans have always been fascinated with the stars, planets, and the universe. This course introduces students to the study of astronomy. Some of the topics that will be studied include the history of astronomy, basic scientific laws of motion and gravity, the concepts of modern astronomy, and the methods used by astronomers to learn more about the universe. Additional topics include the celestial sphere, the solar system, the earth as a system in space, the earth/moon system, the sun as a star, star classification and composition, and the Milky Way and other galaxies. The students will use online tools and create models to examine these topics.

 

 

Advanced Topics in Chemistry

Year-Long Course

Grade: 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Chemistry and satisfactory completion of Algebra 2

Advanced Topics in Chemistry will pick up where Chemistry and Chemistry Honors left off. We will spend the first half of the year focusing on kinetics, thermodynamics, equilibrium, and acids and bases. We will spend a significant amount of class time in the lab or working on data analysis. We will also begin reading peer-reviewed scientific articles to develop journal reading skills that will be necessary later in the year. The second part of the year will be dedicated to the development and execution of a Capstone project in one of the three following areas of study: Organic Chemistry, Nano Chemistry, or Polymer/Materials Chemistry. Each one of the areas will be introduced in short modules to give you an idea of where your interests lie. The capstone project will have both primary scientific literature and experimental research components.

 

 

 

AP Biology

Year-Long Course

Grade: 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Biology and Chemistry and science teacher approval.

AP Biology is an academically challenging class taught at the college level. It is equivalent to the first year Biology courses (for majors) offered at many major universities. Students use a college level text and complete college level work. Labs explore the topics studied and employ techniques used in biology laboratories. Students gain experience in the lab with bacterial transformation, DNA electrophoresis, bioinformatics, and other important scientific skills. Students also practice taking data and building meaning from data. Students taking this course explore the following units of study: evolution, cellular processes, genetics and information transfer, and interactions. This course prepares students for the AP Biology exam. Students are required to attend an additional early morning class from 8:00 am to 8:30 am each week (day TBD).

 

 

AP Chemistry

Year-Long Course

Grade: 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Chemistry or Chemistry Honors and Algebra 2; science teacher approval.

This is a college-level advanced chemistry course. Complex problem solving requiring mathematical techniques is required as well as sound experimental skills. Areas of study include: atomic theory, bonding, nuclear chemistry, gases, liquids and solids, solutions, equations and stoichiometry, equilibria, kinetics, thermodynamics, and organic chemistry. This course prepares students for the AP Chemistry exam. Students are required to attend an additional early morning class from 8:00 am to 8:30 am each week (day TBD).

 

 

 

AP Physics C: Mechanics

Year-Long Course

Grade: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Physics Honors course and completion of or concurrent enrollment in Calculus. Science and math Department approval is a must.

This course provides systematic instruction in the following areas: kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy, and power; momentum and collisions; circular motion, rotation, and rolling; oscillations and gravitation. The laboratory component requires students to design experiments, make observations of physical phenomena, organize and analyze data, draw inferences from data, analyze errors, communicate results, and suggest further lines of investigation. Assigned work extends concepts discussed in class and requires students to apply those concepts to new and unfamiliar situations. This course is intended for those students who have not only done well in Physics Honors, but who also exhibit a genuine passion for the subject and are motivated to delve into further mathematical, conceptual, and experimental analysis of the subject. This course prepares students for the AP Physics C Mechanics exam. Students are required to attend an additional early morning class from 8:00 am to 8:30 am each week (day TBD).

 

 

AP Physics: E&M

Year-Long Course

Grade: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of Physics Honors course and completion of AP Calculus AB. Science and math Department approval is a must.

This calculus-based course provides systematic instruction in the following areas: electric forces and fields, potential and capacitance, AC and DC circuits, magnetism, and induction. The laboratory component requires students to design experiments, make observations of physical phenomena, organize and analyze data, draw inferences from data, analyze errors, communicate results, and suggest further lines of investigation. Assigned work will extend concepts discussed in class and will require students to apply those concepts to new and unfamiliar situations. This course is intended for those students who have not only done well in Physics Honors, but who also exhibit a genuine passion for the subject and are motivated to delve into further mathematical, conceptual, and experimental analysis of the subject. This course prepares students for the AP Physics C Electromagnetism exam. Students will be required to attend an additional early morning class from 8:00 am to 8:30 am each week (day TBD).

VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS

Kehillah offers inspiring and challenging curricula in the visual and performing arts including; music, studio art, digital art, and drama. Each class is crafted specifically to help students forge enduring habits of lifelong learning, love of the arts, and personal creative expression. Courses are tailored to individual needs and focus on learning through hands-on experience.

One year of visual or performing arts is required for graduation, but students are welcome to take multiple classes as electives. The course guides below delineate the current course offerings in each of the visual and performing arts.

Visual and Performing Arts Teachers:
Mr. Jake Arky
Ms. Jen Idleman
Mr. Daniel Mirer
Mr. Tom Romero
Mr. Tony Quartuccio

VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS COURSES

Studio Art

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course is an introduction to art creation and theory through materials, skills, and techniques. It includes applications in conceptual design, color, and compositional theory. The projects focus on the elements and principles of design including: line, color, shape and form, texture, value, and space. This course features a particular focus on drawing and rendering to allow each student to build a strong foundation of visual awareness and creativity.

 

 

 

Digital Design

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Digital Design is a skill-based class focused on learning graphic design, composition, color theory, and typography. The course will include learning the technical skills and application of Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. Within the exploration of these programs, the students will also learn industry standard practices and techniques in design.

 

 

 

Photography

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

This is an introductory course in photography where students will explore the technical and artistic aspects of this art form. They will learn to manipulate camera controls to achieve desired effects in their photos. They will also learn and apply the principles and elements of design in order to fully investigate how to make a good photograph. Students will apply this understanding to the process of making meaning in their own work.

 

 

 

Advanced Studio Art

Year-Long Course

Grade: 11, 12

Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion two introductory classes or teacher approval

This is an advanced level course students can undertake after two years of art classes. Students refine their skills in their medium of choice as well as improve their understanding of artistic composition and their ability to analyze works of art. This class puts a strong focus on portfolio development, both in creating a cohesive body of work and exploring new media. Students develop the skills and understanding that will enable them to proceed to AP Studio Art the following year.

 

 

 

AP Studio Art

Year-Long Course

Grade: 11, 12

Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion two introductory classes or teacher approval

Students will refine and expand art practice, concentrating on completion and preparation of the Advanced Placement Art Portfolio. Students will expand technical knowledge and ability. Each student will work to develop and refine a personal voice. They will consider and explore values, vision, perspective, message, and medium. Students will complete the three sections of the AP portfolio submission using the College Board guidelines for assessment. This course will require significant work outside of class time.

 

 

 

Intro to Illustration

Spring Semester Course

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of Studio Art or departmental approval via portfolio review

This course will expose drawing students to many possibilities in the vast world of Illustration. Students will work on creating their own style, while exploring different media and techniques. Students will learn about and experiment with different types of Illustration (editorial, advertisement, children’s, etc.) and learn to work within the confines of others’ written work, as well as create their own. This class is for students who already have strong fundamental drawing skills, and therefore students must have completed Studio Art or submit a portfolio for review in order to take this class.

 

 

 

Intro to Painting

Fall Semester Course

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of Studio Art or departmental approval via portfolio review

Intro to Painting is a fall semester class designed to introduce students to various forms and techniques in painting. Students will explore different types and applications of paint (acrylic, water, and oil) and how different surfaces affect the craft. Special focus will be placed on composition, color, and development of personal style. This class is meant for students who already have had exposure to the elements and principles of design and color theory. Therefore, students must have completed Studio Art or submit a portfolio for review in order to take this class.

 

 

 

Art History

Fall Semester Class

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

An overview of the history of art around the world. We’ll look at art from prehistoric times to contemporary works and discuss the meaning of art in our world. You’ll learn to read images, understand themes throughout art history and think like an artist. How does art influence our culture? How does culture shape the artist and their art? What makes some art timeless? What is it about art that makes it so meaningful to us as humans? We’ll discuss all these topics and more!

 

 

 

Design thinking

Spring Semester Class

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Design thinking means coming up with brilliant ideas that the world has never seen before. When you look at the world around you, do you often find yourself thinking of better solutions to every day things? In this class, we’ll learn the process of identifying opportunities for creative problem solving, brainstorming new ideas, communicating your ideas to others and (in some cases), building your idea. This is a process you can apply to school, work, and everything else for the rest of your life, PLUS it’s super fun. No previous drawing or “artistic” experience needed.

 

 

Design for Package and Print

Semester Course, Fall and Spring

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of Digital Design or departmental approval via portfolio review

Graphic Design has hundreds of applications, each with its own challenges. This course takes a closer look at two types of designing: package design and design for print. Students will grapple with design thinking challenges, working for a client, designing a 3-D surface, typography, scale, branding, color psychology, and more. This class is meant for students who already have had exposure to the elements and principles of design and have knowledge of Photoshop and Illustrator. Therefore, students must have completed Digital Design or submit a portfolio for review in order to take this class.

 

 

 

Publication Design (Yearbook)

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

This class is devoted to conquering the design challenges in planning, creating, publishing, and distributing our school yearbook. Students will be given challenging, real-world projects and assignments typical of the graphic design and publishing industries. Skills developed include: page design, advanced publishing techniques, copywriting, editing, and teamwork. Though this is an intro class, it is a great portfolio builder for design and photography students.

 

 

 

Theater Arts

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Theater is a place to explore, create, and make characters and stories come to life. Students will get an introduction to ensemble-based theater creation, using the class as a theatrical company to generate adaptations of Shakespeare, write and stage original scenes and monologues, produce storytelling performances with multimedia, and learn the basics of long-form improvisation. Audition techniques, modern playwright retrospective, and acting essentials are core tools to this class and will be frequently addressed throughout various projects. Those with experience will collaborate with those who have almost no experience, just a desire to get in front of an audience and express themselves.

 

 

 

Advanced Theater Arts

Year-Long Course

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Theater Arts or satisfactory completion of 11th grade

Taking the theatrical experience to the next level, students will have the opportunity to not only act, but step into the playwright and director chair as well. Advanced Theater  Arts asks students to take the initiative of creating and producing new work, from writing a ten-minute play to directing other students in a night of original plays made by the class. Musical theater creation, solo performance, and advanced improvisation workshops will be included throughout, giving students the skill set and freedom to explore new work that comes from them and reflects their unique voices.

 

 

 

Back Stage 101

Year-Long Course

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Theater Arts

Being backstage can be as important as being on stage. Students will get the opportunity to learn the basics of lighting, sound, costume, set, and production design, as well as implementing those skills both in and out of class. Lessons will cover sound and lighting board operations, as well as stage management best practices. Special note: All students are required to be part of the tech crew for the after school productions in both the fall and spring semesters. Seniors are advised to opt-in for the spring semester to not conflict with college applications.

 

 

 

Reel Perspective

Year-Long Course

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Documentary and narrative filmmaking can be provocative, controversial, and topical. Over the course of the fall semester, students will view documentaries from the last 40 years including Grizzly Man, Capturing The Friedmans, Bowling for Columbine, Supersize Me, Crumb, and others, including a Rockumentary Retrospective. Spring will offer a variety of independent, main stream, and classic films to dissect, including Do The Right Thing, Citizen Kane, Unforgiven, High Noon, Memento, and The Conversation amongst others. Discussions will be student driven, giving the class an opportunity to analyze the way different directors view the subjects, topics, and themes of their movies through both fictional and non-fictional perspectives.

 

 

 

Acoustic Guitar-Family Ensemble

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

The guitar family consists of guitar, bass guitar, mandolin, banjo, and ukulele. Students learn to read music, scales, and chords. Students improve their own skills and gain the expertise to perform as a group. Students learn elements of musical theory, and are introduced to improvisational and song-writing techniques. Class time is devoted to group songs based on each student’s level of ability, individually guided assignments in technique, instruction in music theory applicable to playing their chosen instrument, and preparation for an end of the semester final performance. Music selected is chosen from different styles including rock, jazz, classical, and folk. Students study the evolution of their instrument and its music over the historical eras. Students also attend, review, and discuss at least two concerts.

 

 

 

Advanced Acoustic Guitar-Family Ensemble

Year-Long Course

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Acoustic Guitar Ensemble or by audition

The guitar-family consists of guitar, bass guitar, mandolin, banjo, and ukulele. This course is a continuation of Acoustic Guitar Ensemble 1 and concentrates on duo, trio, quartets, and solo instrumental pieces. Music performed ranges from the Renaissance to the modern era of music. Music is also selected from many cultures. There is more advanced study in finger picking, flatpicking, left hand technique, and performance. Students participate in performances throughout the school year.

 

 

 

Music Theory and Composition

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

This is an introductory course in music theory that studies the fundamentals of music and music literacy. Students learn the basic terminology related to music theory and composition as well as practice and refine aural skills. Throughout the course, students are presented with a rationale and a historical framework for the concepts and techniques being studied and learn to approach each aspect of the theory of music from an aesthetic vantage. The course focuses on the basic concepts of music, music literacy, and the organizational elements of music, often requiring the student to compose measures reflecting what has been learned about the theory of music.

 

 

Advanced Music Theory and Composition

Year-Long Course

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Music Theory and Composition or teacher approval

While the class begins with a complete review of music basics, the course presumes a somewhat fluent level in musical reading and notation from the start. Time is spent discovering how small patterns such as scales, intervals, and triads combine to create larger units such as phrases, periods, and two- and three-part form. In class, students work on sight singing and ear training; the goal is to develop the ability to read a musical score without singing or playing it out loud. Students are also taught to transcribe musical sounds into notation. Regular melodic and harmonic dictation is given in class. Short compositions are assigned throughout the year to illustrate fundamental principles being studied, and the final project is the composition of a longer piece by each student to be included in a concert at the end of the school year. Students also engage in critical and analytical listening to major works from the classics of European and American composers from the Middle Ages to the present.

 

 

 

AP Music Theory and Composition

Year-Long Course

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Advanced Music Theory and Composition or teacher approval

The ultimate goal of an AP Music Theory course is to develop a student’s ability to recognize, understand, and describe the basic materials and processes of music that are heard or presented in a score. The achievement of this goal is best promoted by integrated approaches to the student’s development of: aural skills through listening exercises; sight-singing skills through performance exercises; written skills through written exercises; compositional skills through creative exercises; and analytical skills through analytical exercises. This course prepares students for the AP Music Theory and Composition exam.

 

 

 

Jazz/Blues/Folk/World Music Ensemble

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Must read music and demonstrate proficiency on an instrument or voice. Auditions for bands may be required.

Students in this course participate in an ensemble consisting of any combination of acoustic and electric instruments that performs music of many different styles, genres, and eras. The musicians will have prior ability on their musical instruments. As part of the ensemble, students will have opportunities to solo, improvise, compose, arrange, record, and broadcast music. Classes will involve large and small ensemble playing. For each piece studied and performed, students will learn and analyze the piece’s historical significance, style, form, harmonic progression, and performance practice. Students will learn how to perform together as a group, sight read music, listen critically, and work toward a long-term goal. The class will culminate in a final concert performance for their school, families, and community.

 

WORLD LANGUAGES

The World Languages department at Kehillah provides students with a rich variety of course offerings in four different languages: French, Hebrew, Spanish and Latin. Each student at Kehillah is required to take two consecutive years of a foreign language; three years or more of study are strongly encouraged.

All our language courses provide students with a solid academic foundation in the grammar and syntax of the target language while simultaneously focusing on the four language skills: reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking. These skills are practiced and reinforced through a variety of in-class activities and projects (including interviews, exposure to French, Spanish, or Israeli newspapers and television programming, presentations, skits, story-telling, listening to music, and working with interactive online resources, to name just a few). Such activities are designed to engage as many different learning styles as possible and also to encourage students toward their ultimate goal of being able to communicate comfortably with native speakers.

In addition, our World Language courses introduce students to different cultural and historical aspects of the various communities which speak each language. Courses routinely include units on material culture (art and architecture, e.g.) and discussion of current events. Our students are thus challenged and encouraged to take what they learn from their language studies and apply it to the culturally and linguistically diverse world beyond the classroom walls.

Language Teachers:
Ms. Ronit Balan
Ms. Einav Cohen
Dr. Sabine Dazin
Ms. Teresa Fradejas
Dr. Sarah Janda
Mr. Robert Smith

WORLD LANGUAGES COURSES

All Kehillah students are required to take two years of the same language in order to graduate. Three consecutive years of the same language is strongly recommended and required by many colleges and universities.

 

 

Hebrew 1

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Hebrew 1 is an introductory-level course, aimed at students who have either no previous knowledge of Hebrew or who need a thorough review of foundational skills. The course objective is to develop all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Modern Hebrew with an emphasis on active use of the language and its cultural context. The course provides an opportunity for creativity and intellectual stimulation in the study of a foreign language and culture.

 

 

 

Hebrew 2

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Hebrew 1 or teacher approval

Hebrew 2 is a course designed for students who are already familiar with the basic structures of the Modern Hebrew language. The course continues to develop speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills, with an emphasis on active use of the target language. Student work focuses on reading comprehension and on learning about the cultural context. The course provides an opportunity for creativity and intellectual stimulation by combining the study of a foreign language with the study of Israeli culture.

 

 

 

Hebrew 3

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Hebrew 2 or teacher approval

Hebrew 3 is an intermediate-level course designed for students who have achieved basic proficiency in the grammar and structure of Modern Hebrew. Students study, strengthen, and review syntax, vocabulary, and linguistic structures in addition to further developing skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. The course is conducted in Hebrew with a strong emphasis on communication skills.

 

 

 

Hebrew 3 Honors

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Hebrew 2 or teacher approval

Hebrew 3 Honors is an advanced-level course designed for students who have achieved fundamental proficiency in the grammar and structure of Modern Hebrew. Students further develop their skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. The course systematically focuses on vocabulary expansion, presents advanced grammar, and enriches and expands student writing skills. The course is designed to increase the fluency and complexity of the student’s comprehension and expression, as well as generate in the student a greater appreciation of Hebrew language and literature. The course is conducted in Hebrew with a strong emphasis on communication.

 

 

 

Hebrew 4

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Hebrew 3 or teacher approval

Hebrew 4 is an advanced course designed for students who have achieved advanced proficiency in the grammar and structure of Modern Hebrew as well as in speaking. Students review, study, and strengthen syntax, vocabulary, and linguistic structures in addition to further developing skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. The course is conducted in Hebrew with a strong emphasis on communication skills. The course further develops students’ interest in pursuing opportunities for social interaction and cultural learning involving Hebrew and Israel.

 

 

 

Hebrew 4 Honors

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Hebrew 3 or teacher approval

Hebrew 4 Honors is an accelerated course designed for students who are proficient in the grammar and structure of Modern Hebrew. Syntax, vocabulary, and linguistic structures are reinforced in addition to further developing skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. The course is conducted in Hebrew with a strong emphasis on enriching and expanding the student’s understanding through a collection of Israeli literature.

 

 

 

Hebrew 5 Honors

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Hebrew 4 or teacher approval

Hebrew 5 Honors is aimed at students who are highly motivated and have relatively strong Hebrew proficiency. Syntax, vocabulary, and linguistic structures are reinforced in addition to further developing skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. This course is conducted in Hebrew with strong emphasis on enriching and expanding the student’s understanding through a collection of Israeli short stories, poetry, articles, and films. Students learn about the social and cultural issues that stand at the heart of Israeli society. Activities in this course include analysis of texts, creative writing, oral presentations, debates, and role-plays. Throughout the year the students are engaged in a variety of creative projects.

 

 

 

Hebrew 6 Honors

Year-Long Course

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Hebrew 5 or teacher approval

Hebrew 6 Honors expands upon intensive Hebrew study. Syntax, vocabulary, and linguistic structures are reinforced in addition to further developing skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. This course is conducted in Hebrew with strong emphasis on enriching and expanding the student’s understanding through a collection of Israeli short stories, poetry, articles, and films. Students learn about the social and cultural issues that stand at the heart of Israeli society. Activities in this course include analysis of texts, creative writing, oral presentations, debates, and role-plays. Throughout the year the students are engaged in small and creative projects.

 

 

 

Israeli Law and Society Honors

Year-Long Course

Grade: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Hebrew 6 Honors or Israeli Society through Literature and the Media

This is an advanced‐level course for students who are fluent in all areas: reading, writing, speaking, and grammar. This course emphasizes the critical study of moral values and philosophical and social questions of law and justice. It compares Israeli law and American law, this course familiarizes students with the different systems of law and the philosophies behind them. Students will learn current constitutional law, tort law, contract law, family law, and criminal law. The primary objective of this course is to provide learners with a high level of communication and critical thinking skills in Hebrew. Reading comprehension will also be emphasized while exposing students to original texts of the Israeli laws, legal articles, and court decisions in Hebrew. In addition, students will analyze the laws and articles in depth. Activities in this course include text readings and analysis, class discussions, essay writing, oral presentations, reading novels, and writing book reports.

 

 

 

Spanish 1

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Spanish 1 introduces students to the four skills of language study. It stresses competency in listening and understanding, speaking, reading, and writing with emphasis on listening and speaking through student-oriented activities, such as role plays, skits, and oral presentations. The course’s proficiency-oriented textbook integrates the four skills with a study of culture and encourages student-centered activities. Cultural lessons are interwoven into the curriculum to provide a basic overview of Spain and Latin America and to expose students to the cultural diversity of the Spanish-speaking world. This course is taught entirely in Spanish.

 

 

 

Spanish 2

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Spanish 1 or teacher approval

Spanish 2 is taught entirely in Spanish, and continues to build on the proficiency skills developed in Spanish 1, namely, listening, speaking, reading, and writing. New vocabulary and structures are introduced systematically and assimilated through guided practice and role playing. Testing requires demonstration of competency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students continue their study of the culture of the Spanish-speaking world. Students participate in class activities using Spanish only. The text offers an integrated program of CD’s and videos to support student learning and to provide exposure to a variety of native speakers and cultural settings. The class emphasizes reading and comprehension of articles and literature from the Spanish-speaking world. Students learn to write by using paragraphs, short stories, and poetry as models, and they expand their vocabulary by continually creating and applying their own personal glossaries.

 

 

 

Spanish 2 Honors

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Spanish 1 or teacher approval

Spanish 2 Honors is an accelerated course taught entirely in Spanish, and works at a fast pace to build on the proficiency skills developed in Spanish 1, namely, listening, speaking, reading, and writing. New vocabulary and structures are introduced systematically and assimilated through guided practice and role playing. Testing requires demonstration of competency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students continue their study of the culture of the Spanish-speaking world. Students participate in class activities using Spanish only. The text offers an integrated program of CD’s and videos to support student learning and to provide exposure to a variety of native speakers and cultural settings. Study will be supplemented by various other target language materials. The class emphasizes reading and comprehension of articles and literature from the Spanish-speaking world. Students learn to write by using paragraphs, short stories, and poetry as models, and they expand their vocabulary by continually creating and applying their own personal glossaries.

 

 

 

Spanish 3

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Spanish 2 or teacher approval

Spanish 3 is an intermediate-level Spanish course which is designed to review the basic structures of the language studied in levels 1 and 2. The major objective is to enable students to become more proficient in the language at an appropriate pace. There is a continued emphasis on developing the four basic language skills: listening and understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. This is achieved by using many different methods, such as repetition, drilling, aural and reading comprehension exercises, writing assignments (including letters, compositions, and poems), and oral activities (including dialogues, skits, one-act plays, and presentations). The text offers an integrated program of award-winning short films to support student learning and to provide exposure to a variety of native speakers and cultural settings. In addition, students read short stories, fables and legends and learn about the variety of cultures that compose the Spanish-speaking world.

 

 

 

Spanish 3 Honors

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Spanish 2 or teacher approval

Spanish 3 Honors is an intermediate-level course, designed to work at a fast pace to build on the vocabulary and concepts introduced in previous Spanish courses. It continues to assist students in developing the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. There is an initial review of grammar and vocabulary learned previously. Students expand their vocabulary bank as they improve their pronunciation and fluency. Literature in the form of short stories and legends are introduced. Students are also exposed through readings and award-winning short films to cultural elements of the Spanish-speaking world. There is significant emphasis on writing in the target language with increasing accuracy. The entire course is conducted in Spanish.

 

 

 

Spanish 4

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Spanish 3 or teacher approval

Spanish 4 is an advanced language course that develops the skills students acquired in the intermediate levels. The knowledge of the language is used to explore the history, culture, art (including cinematography), and literature of the Spanish-speaking world. Students are expected to research particular topics (historical, literary, and cultural) in depth and to write long essays or papers. Students enhance their vocabulary bank and sharpen their oral skills through on-going debates and oral presentations. Students are exposed to the richness of the language and the cultural diversity of the Spanish-speaking world through reading a wide array of literary pieces.

 

 

 

Spanish 4 Honors

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Spanish 3 or teacher approval Spanish 4 Honors is an advanced and accelerated language course that develops the skills students acquired in the intermediate levels, with a special emphasis on oral presentation and written composition. The knowledge of the language is used to explore the history, culture, art (including cinematography), and literature of the Spanish-speaking world. Students are expected to research particular topics (historical, literary, and cultural) in depth and to write long essays or papers, accompanied by presentations to the class and peer critique. Students enhance their vocabulary bank and sharpen their oral skills through on-going debates and oral presentations. Students are exposed to the richness of the language and the cultural diversity of the Spanish-speaking world through reading a wide array of literary pieces.

 

 

 

AP Spanish Language and Culture

Year-Long Course

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Spanish 4 or teacher approval

AP Spanish is an advanced language course that emphasizes increasing proficient communication. It is designed for those students who have successfully completed Spanish 4. The course stresses language usage and comprehension through the reading and discussion of literature (plays, short stories or poems), advanced grammar study, an overview of the history of Spain and Latin America, viewing of films and videos produced by native Spanish speakers, reading of authentic print materials and original essays, and student journal writing. Communication is developed by presenting information, concepts and ideas, and making connections with other disciplines, comparing the language and the culture studied with their own.

 

 

 

Advanced Spanish

Year-Long Course

Grade: 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of AP Spanish or teacher approval

This is an advanced‐level course for students who have attained proficiency in the four different Spanish skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. This course emphasizes the critical study of different primary source texts (in various media), along with research into the cultural and historical contexts behind them.  The primary objective of this course is to provide learners with a high level of communication and critical thinking skills in Spanish. Reading comprehension will be emphasized, as will seminar-style discussion and analytical writing.

 

 

French 1

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

This introductory course presents the four basic language skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing through student-oriented activities, such as role plays, skits and oral presentations. The fundamentals of basic grammar, tenses, and everyday vocabulary are stressed as indispensable tools for comprehension and expression. The course will present to students the culture, music, and geography of the French speaking world.

 

 

 

French 2

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of French 1 or teacher approval

This course is taught entirely in French and completes the basics of the language and includes simplified readings highlighting French customs, culture, and everyday life. New vocabulary and structures are introduced systematically and assimilated through guided practice and role playing. Testing requires demonstration of competency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students learn to write by using paragraphs, short stories, and poetry as models, and they expand their vocabulary by continually creating and applying their own personal glossaries.

 

 

 

French 3

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of French 2 or teacher approval

This course reviews the French language and the culture of the French-speaking world. It helps students solidify a large vocabulary and to reinforce the major linguistics structures of the language introduced in previous years so that students may proceed with linguistic confidence to higher levels of communicative functionality with fluency and accuracy. To this end, all four languages skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing are incorporated, although in a primarily reactive mode. The goal is to initiate and sustain a basic array of communicative tasks and social interactions. Primary texts, video, audio, and computer support are used to give students a wide exposure to French and Francophone cultural texts. To help map out their progress, students keep a dossier containing all of their work throughout the year.

 

 

 

French 3 Honors

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of French 2 or teacher approval

This course reviews the French language and the culture of the French-speaking world. Designed to work at a fast pace to solidify a large vocabulary and to reinforce the major linguistics structures of the language introduced in previous years so that students may proceed with linguistic confidence to higher levels of communicative functionality with fluency and accuracy. To this end, all four languages skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing are incorporated, although in a primarily reactive mode. The goal is to initiate and sustain a basic array of communicative tasks and social interactions. Primary texts, video, audio, and computer support are used to give students a wide exposure to French and Francophone cultural texts. There is significant emphasis on writing in the target language with increasing accuracy. The entire course is conducted in French. To help map out their progress, students keep a dossier containing all of their work throughout the year.

 

 

 

French 4

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of French 3 or teacher approval

This course is designed to build on the vocabulary and concepts introduced in previous French courses. It continues to assist students in developing the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. As in the previous years, students will expand their vocabulary, improve their pronunciation and fluency in French with listening exercises, short readings, dialogues, writing assignments, in-class presentations, and other conversational activities. Students are also exposed through readings and projects to cultural elements of the French-speaking world.

 

 

 

AP French Language and Culture

Year-Long Course

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of French 4 or teacher approval

This course will focus on interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communication. The course will build communication skills through class discussion, conversations, collaboration with classmates, role plays, essay and journal writing, and oral presentations. The students will be trained to understand and interpret written and audio texts in French. They will continue to work on vocabulary and cultural knowledge of several francophone societies and cultures. The course encourages cultural awareness, and will include various aspects of the cultures of the French-speaking world including television and film, books, customs and traditions, values, attitudes, and beliefs. Students will study a variety of topics in interesting, meaningful, and engaging contexts.

 

 

 

Latin 1

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Latin 1 or teacher approval

This beginning Latin class introduces students to the vocabulary, grammar, and syntax of the Latin language. Since Latin is no longer a spoken language, students concentrate on the skills of translation (from Latin into English) as well as the building of English vocabulary based on Latin cognates. Much of English grammar and syntax is derived from Latin, and thus the course teaches students a sophisticated understating of English grammar as well. Students also study Latin in the context of Roman history and culture.

 

 

 

Latin 2

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Latin 1 or teacher approval

This intermediate Latin class begins with a thorough review of the vocabulary, grammar, and syntax of Latin I. Students then learn advanced Latin grammar and syntax including indirect statement and the subjunctive mood and its uses. Students hone their translation skills and translate selections from Latin authors in the original. Students continue to build their English vocabulary with Latin-derived words as well as explore Roman culture and history.

 

 

 

Latin 3

Year-Long Course

Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Latin 2 or teacher approval

Latin III focuses on the skills of translating classical Latin texts into meaningful and thoughtful English. Students are introduced to a wide selection of Latin prose and poetry in the original and become familiar with a variety of writing styles, poetic constructions, and rhetorical devices. After a semester review of Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary through a survey of Latin authors, students study the poetry of Catullus and the rhetoric of Cicero. Students become increasingly competent translators, understanding the nuances and challenges inherent to translation from a classical language to modern English.

 

 

 

AP Latin

Year-Long Course

Grade: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Latin 3 or teacher approval

The central focus of this course is the in-depth reading and critical analysis of selections from both Vergil’s Aeneid (a literary epic which has had an enduring influence on literature and art) and Caesar’s Gallic Wars (Julius Caesar’s account of his military activities among the Gauls). We will study the grammatical concepts, vocabulary, meter, figures of speech, and rhetorical devices essential for reading and understanding both Vergil’s poetry and Caesar’s prose. Extensive work is done on reading comprehension, sight translation, and writing critical essays. Students become familiar with the cultural, social, and political history of the late Republican and Augustan Ages. By the completion of this course, students are prepared to take the AP exam in Latin (Caesar and Vergil).